These fact sheets highlight Latino parental involvement in education and the representation of Latinas in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields.

Prior learning assessment (PLA) provides opportunities to evaluate a student’s learning from work or life experience for the purpose of awarding college credit. Excelencia in Education partnered with CAEL for this report that examines the experience of Latino students with PLA at 10 postsecondary institutions in the U.S. between 2010...

The 2014 Examples of Excelencia recognizes selected programs in higher education at the Associate, Baccalaureate, Graduate levels as well as at Community-Based Organizations (CBOs), a new category added this year. The compendium contains one-page program summary of the 4 Examples of Excelencia, the 15 finalist programs, and...

Latino student success is America’s success and what institutions do to support Latino students really matters. Learn more about nationally recognized programs that do not serve Latino students exclusively, but do disaggregate their data and can demonstrate success with Latino students.

Central Appalachia is not frequently considered when talking about the growth in the Latino population in the United States; however, some of the states in this region have the fastest growing Latino populations in the country.

Most Latino students who enroll in college begin at community colleges. This paper highlights how Excelencia in Education, Single Stop USA, and innovative community colleges across the country are making smart changes in their student services that are helping thousands of Latino students access millions of dollars in supports and services...

This brief provides background on the creation of the Growing What Works initiative to expand the reach of evidence-based practices focused on Latino student success, the initial impact of SEMILLAS grants, lessons learned, and challenges.

The importance of college degree completion for U.S. society and economic competitiveness makes it imperative to improve educational outcomes for Latino students.

While there are a growing number of programs worthy of recognition for their efforts to increase Latino student success, Examples of Excelencia focuses on institution-based...

The importance of college degree completion for U.S. society and economic competitiveness makes it imperative to improve educational outcomes for Latino students. Institutional leaders, educators, and policymakers who recognize this imperative are challenged to determine what they can do to improve educational outcomes for Latino students.

According to the US Census Bureau, Latino young adults are less likely to have earned an associate degree or higher than other young adults. In 2008, eight percent of Latinos 18 to 24 years-of-age had earned a degree, compared to 14 percent of all young adults.

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