Texas

TX

The Graduate Support Center (GSC) was established in 2010 via a Department of Education HSI Title V Promoting Post Baccalaureate Opportunities for Hispanic Americans (PPOHA) grant as a multipurpose learning assistance and support services center.  The Center offers an Academic Workshop Series, a Graduate Writing Institute, and Family Orientation to increase student’s educational success. Hispanics represent 48% of master’s degree students.

Initiated in Fall 2005, the Student Employment Initiative (SEI) is part of a retention and timely graduation strategy that recognizes the compelling need of students to work while attending college.

The biotechnology program, founded in 2008, implemented a research-mentoring program serving their predominately underrepresented and rural student population. This initiative engages students in a meaningful research experience early in their academic careers in order to achieve lasting implications for student success and long-term development of a community of successful students.

Although Texas as a whole has always had a high percentage of Hispanics, the rural areas of North Central Texas have only recently experienced this rapid growth. Located on the Texas/Oklahoma border, the Hispanic population at Grayson College grew by 82% between 2000 and 2010 as compared to a 9.3% growth of the total student population.

Developed in 2001, the UTRGV/UT- Austin College of Pharmacy Cooperative Doctoral Program in Pharmacy (CDPP) encourages students from the Rio Grande Valley and Laredo regions of South Texas to pursue pharmacy as a career, and provides recruitment, training and retention of proficient pharmacists that understand the language and culture of the largely Hispanic South Texas community.

Established in 1972, St Edward’s University (SEU) has the only CAMP that has been in continuous operation. The CAMP enables students from migrant and seasonal farm worker families to achieve their dream of a college degree. These students are first-generation college goers, who have often times experienced disruptions in their primary and secondary education while migrating with their families to work in the fields.

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